By Tina Perinotto

21 December 2009 – Australia’s urban survival strategies in 2050 might include cities whose urban growth boundaries are at the centre, vertical cities that produce energy and food at the top for those below, or cities built from Noosa to Geelong.

At least if the architects, engineers even the Bangarra Dance company have their way, judging by the creative and provocative urban visions shortlisted for Australia’s contribution to the Venice Biennale.

The shortlist, announced on Friday (18 December) was selected from 129 submissions entered in the national Ideas for Australia’s cities 2050+ competition, run by the Australian Institute of Architects’ 2010 Venice Architecture Biennale Creative Directors, John Gollings and Ivan Rijavec.

The competition, the two-part “NOW + WHEN Australian Urbanism” aims is to find three of Australia’s most interesting urban regions, as they are “now” and how they might look in 2050 through the eyes of seven “futuristic urban environments” , the creative directors said.

The shortlist includes:

  • New cities housing between 50,000-100,000 people in current desert areas to address our expected population growth;
  • Cities in which urban development is concentrated in peripheral areas, such as large landholdings on university campuses, ‘big box’ shopping centres, business parks, industrial estates, recreational reserves, and market gardens to establish a series of interlinked, self-sustaining districts dispersed along a transport ring.
  • Cities which feature a “tartan-like texture of pure urban areas (or cells), pure rural cells, and cells which are a hybrid of rural and urban”, providing a “vital flexibility for a sustainable future”.
  • Cities designed for “urban life without fear”, based on the belief that “any design for a good, sustainable city for the 21st century will demand a theory of hope and the desirable”.
  • Cities within cities a city’s growth boundary is not on its periphery but at its heart and a Green City, where the top plane provides wind and solar energy to power (and cool) the multiple cities below, as well as all food production.
  • Cities woven into the landscape’ – balancing dense human settlement with flora and fauna biodiversity, with major roadways converted into natural landscape corridors.
  • Cities hugging the coast from Noosa to Geelong to accommodate population growth and the preferred coastal climate, with very fast trains to connect them

John Gollings said these ideas now needed to be turned into “tangible 3D models which can be screened as virtual, built projects for exhibition in the Australian Pavilion in Venice.”

He said: “This process will challenge the normal speculative imaging often produced by architects, and lead to new presentation techniques benefiting the whole profession as the world embraces 3D, virtual, and holographic media.

“From the test results with our 3D projectors, now running in Melbourne, the Australian pavilion at the 2010 Venice Biennale will be a standout attraction.”

Co-director Ivan Rijavec, Principal of innovative architectural practice Rijavec Architects said: “We currently have 93 per cent of Australians living in urban environments being affected every living minute by the way in which our cities function.

“Our management of these centres is fundamental to arresting global warming, and it wouldn’t be too an extravagant a claim to say there’s nothing more important in the contemporary Australian debate.”

( See What’s On for details of the Venice Biennale dates.)


Venice Architecture Biennale 2010 –
shortlist of submissions: WHEN Ideas for Australia’s Cities 2050+
competition

REF#

SUBMISSION TITLE

ORGANISATION

CONTACT

STATE

6

Sydney 2050: Fraying Ground

Terroir

Gerard Reinmuth

NSW

15

Networks Eco-polis

Whitford and Brearley

Steven Whitford

VIC

23

Urban Life Without Fear

Faculty of Architecture Building and
Planning, University of Melbourne

Justyna Karakiewicz

VIC

30

A Future Australian City

EDMOND & CORRIGAN

Maggie Edmond

VIC

31

Mould City

Colony Architects

Peter Raisbeck

VIC

33

Sedimentary City

University of Queensland

Brit Andresen

QLD

34

Not All Arrows Hit the Target

NH Architecture

Francesca Black

VIC

49

Multiple Cities

John Wardle Architects

John Wardle

VIC

52

biomimetic city

Arup Sydney

Alanna Howe, Alexander Hespe

NSW

54

fmd architects

Fiona Dunin, Alex Peck, Martina Johnson

VIC

61

Love and Movement

Woodhead & Bangarra Dance

Angelo Di Marco

NSW

70

Rubix Cube

BKK Architects, Village Well, Charter Keck
Kramer

George Huon

VIC

86

Hassell, Holopoint, University of Adelaide

Timothy Horton

SA

77

e-agora 2059

Lean Productions

Tom Rivard

NSW

79

Cities of Resilience

Arup Sydney

Diana Griffiths

NSW

84

Speciation City

Curtin Uni + The University of Western
Australia

Rene Van Meeuwen

WA

92

Island Proposition 2100

room11 hobart + Katrina Stoll

Scott Lloyd

TAS

93

When 2100

Lacoste + Stevenson Architects, Craig
Allchin, FROST design

angela rowson

NSW

95

Implementing the Rhetoric

Harrison and White Pty Ltd

Marcus White

VIC

103

How Does it Make You Feel?

Statkus Architecture + others

Ben Statkus

VIC

104

Loop City

MGS with BILD + DYSKORS and MATERIAL
THINKING

Jocelyn Chiew

VIC

117

A Tale of Two Cities 2100

Billard Leece Partnership

Rajith Senanayake

VIC

122

The Mangrove occupying the Now and WHEN of
the waters edge

Innovarchi

Stephanie Smith

NSW

126

Cloudnets

Minifie Nixon Architects + RMIT

Paul Minifie

VIC