After a few other provocative contributions to the thinking reader, here’s the next missive from Brisbane based Russell Hall on Queensland’s penchant for raising up houses above the site.


“What has a high-set house ever done for us?”

“Less chance of being flooded.”

“OK, other than not flooding, what has a high-set house ever done for us?”

“You can have an activities area/workshop under the house.”

“A dreamer. We make nothing: import it all. Right oh. Other than not flooding and a work area under, what has a high-set house ever done for us?”

“Don’t need to use the step machine at the gym.”

“You’re not calling me a slob are you! So, except for not flooding, a work area and getting exercise with your daily activities what has a high-set house ever done for us?”

“Less costly to build on sloping sites. Doesn’t need mass excavation, no dumping of excavated material, no expensive retaining walls.”

“Yeah, that’s true. Now, other than not flooding, a work area under, getting daily exercise un-obtrusively and far less site costs on sloping ground, what has a high-set house ever done for us?

“Higher, get more sun for your solar panels.”

“Really! Except for not flooding, work area under, gaining more exercise, most cost effective on sloping sites and greater access to the sun for solar panels, what has a high-set house ever done for us?

“Less site cover than any low-set house; ya get a bigger yard”

“Besides not flooding, a good work area under, giving you more exercise, cost efficient on sloping sites, increased electricity from solar panels and less site cover, what has a high-set house ever done for us?”

“Even a stinking roger would drop leaves into a slab-on-ground house’s gutters. Can’t do that on a high-set.”

There’s always one smartie in every audience. Leaves get blown into all gutters. “Anyway, what has a high- set house ever done for us?”

“Easier and cheaper to extend under. Don’t have to move out, no existing walls to be demolished, no mitreing into the existing roof.”

“Summing up: other than not flooding, a useful work area under, get more exercise, highly cost effective on sloping sites, better solar electricity production, less site cover and easier to extend under, that would be it.”

“No!”

“What else?”

“Should you wish to redevelop the site, the high set house can be trucked to a new location to continue life as a home. You can’t do that with a slab on ground house. It’s dumped.”

God! How do I put up with this pack of banjo playing, hay-seed whoops. You would reckon they would know by now with the abundant surrounding examples that a slab-on-ground house is the one true answer. This mob wouldn’t know if their arseholes was drilled, bored, punched, or reamed.”

[Apologies to “The Life of Brian”]