Meridian Building

10 September 2013 — Wellington’s waterfront Meridian building has achieved a NABERSNZ 5.5 star base building rating – the highest awarded so far under the 6-star scheme launched earlier this year.

Owned by DNZ Property Fund, the Meridian Building was the first 5 Green Star commercial office building to be occupied in New Zealand.

The Meridian Building’s sustainability features include a double-skinned façade; exposed thermal mass; automated window opening, automated, external louvres and internal blinds to control solar gain and glare; daylight-controlled lighting; solar hot water; and air-conditioning via chilled beams.

DNZ chief executive Paul Duffy said the 5.5 star NABERSNZ rating “completed the circle” for the building.

“The Meridian building was designed and built to the highest standards of sustainability and efficiency, with many innovative features. Although we knew it performed well for our tenants, this rating proves it conclusively.

“The 5 Green Star rating shows its potential, while the NABERSNZ rating of 5.5 out of 6 certifies its day-to-day performance.

“As owners and investors, we see a lot of value in a tool like NABERSNZ that provides a credible, independent benchmark for New Zealand’s commercial buildings.”

New Zealand Green Building Council chief executive Alex Cutler said the rating showed the importance of tuning and commissioning a building well.

“Aside from its ground-breaking design, the Meridian building went through a process of fine-tuning its systems well to make sure it really works for its occupants. It’s the perfect balance of being designed sustainably and also being well-run and maintained.

“Good commissioning, tuning and attention to energy management can help all buildings improve their energy use. But certainly a great design gives you a massive head start.”

The NABERSNZ certified rating, carried out by Ben Masters of BECA and Lance Jimmieson of Jackson Engineering Advisors, showed that the building uses just 34 kilowatt-hours of energy per square metre a year.