17 June 2013 — Dubai’s known for having the biggest, the tallest, the most opulent. Now it can add greenest to its list. The Change Initiative, a 4000-square metre sustainability store, has secured the highest Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Commercial Interiors Platinum rating from the US Green Building Council.

The building scored 107 out of the 110 available LEED points, according to Gulf News, making it the most sustainable commercial building in the world, and taking the record from Grocon’s Pixel building in Melbourne, which scored 105 points.

“We have achieved a pinnacle of being sustainable around the world and in a place that is completely paradoxical,” TCI Founder and CEO Gundeep Singh told Gulf News. “Most people believe that Dubai cannot be sustainable or is less sustainable. But we’ve proven that if Dubai can build the tallest, the biggest, then it can also build the most sustainable building.”

The one-year-old TCI building incorporates a range of technologies including solar panels, heat-reflective paint and windows, recycled water and mostly recycled interior materials.

The building operates as a space to demonstrate sustainable alternatives to many products on the market, and markets to consumers as well as business and government clients. It has prominent US environmental campaigner Robert F Kennedy Jr as a director.

Read more here.

4 replies on “Dubai building pips Pixel in sustainability stakes”

  1. We shouldn’t be rating this as a “sustainable building” when it is a green fitout! The base building could be absolutely rubbish, making for an overall average building.
    Credit where credit is due, Pixel at least takes a holistic view of the whole building performance, with a pretty impressively sustainable fitout to boot. What the next owner does is a big To Be Confirmed…here’s hoping they toe the line and go for a green fitout.

  2. Wow lucky LEED doesn’t have any points for beauty or aesthetics as both Pixel & this would be doomed.

  3. This shows what complete bollocks these rating systems are. How can the ‘best’ building be located in the middle of a car park in car-dependent unwalkable sprawl, when we know that travel generates a high proportion of personal carbon footprints? On what planet can a building with car parking ever be considered sustainable? It’s ridiculous! No wonder people are so skeptical of corporate claims of sustainability.

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