Australia’s infrastructure boom continues to ramp up demand for engineers and other construction-related jobs with signs that the resources sector is again on the move and will soon put pressure on the construction sector.

Figures from Seek say jobs in the resources sector have jumped a massive 32 per cent, possibly countering some of the slack that could emerge from the cooling housing market.

In sustainability though, no amount of bad news from the federal government has so far dampened demand.

This week Vicinity Centres nailed its sustainability colours to the mast with a massive second tranche of investment in solar panels, leaving other rivals in the sector behind.

According to Richard Evans from Talent Nation, the sustainability job market for consultants and other specialists is going from strength to strength, and is “busier than ever”.

He said that he observed a “tipping point about a year ago” for jobs growth in the sector after many years of modest increases, with the influx of investor attention likely contributing to the industry’s uptick.

The renewable energy market is still strong, said Mr Evans, with a number of overseas players looking to establish themselves in Australia (again despite the signals coming from Canberra).

There is also evidence to suggest that movement in the resources space – mining, oil and gas – will influence the market in some parts of the country.

This might pick up the slack from the housing sector with some sources indicating that residential architects are preparing to cut their staff.

Recent figures from Seek showed that advertisements in industries such as real estate and architecture have dropped since last year to coincide with a cooling property market: real estate advertisements falling by 13 per cent, for instance.

Design and architecture worker advertisements dropped by 10 per cent over the year. Financial and banking jobs also tumbled. 

Seek advertisements in mining and areas dominated by the public sector saw an uptick, with new job ads for mining, resources and energy rising by 32 per cent.