3 December 2012 – The news from the world’s climate scientists is as bad as it gets. We have the technology to stop pumping out greenhouse gasses now.

Andy Pitman from the University of NSW said the news from climate scientists is that the greenhouse gas emissions path the world is taking “is not a tenable future for the planet – we cannot be that stupid as a species.”

“There are papers that should come with a warning: ‘do not read this if you are depressed’,” he told Fairfax media.

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More highlights follow

From the ABC website: The latest snapshot from climate scientists has found the planet is on track for a 4 to 6 degree Celsius temperature rise by the turn of the century.

As United Nations climate talks enter their final week in Doha on the Persian Gulf, scientists are increasing the pressure on governments to do more to cut the discharge of heat-trapping greenhouse gases.

The Global Carbon Project report, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, has calculated that emissions rose by 3 per cent last year, and 2.6 per cent this year, despite the weak global economy.

Pep Canadell from the CSIRO was one of the lead authors of the report, and says the growth in emissions is shocking.

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From AAP in the Australian Financial Review

Levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are rising annually by around three per cent, placing Earth on track for warming that could breach 5C by 2100, a new study published says.

The figure – among the most alarming of the latest forecasts by climate scientists – is at least double the 2C target set by UN members struggling for a global deal on climate change.

In 2011, global carbon emissions were 54 per cent above 1990 levels, according to the research, published in the journal, Nature Climate Change, by the Global Carbon Project consortium.

“We are on track for the highest emissions projections, which point to a rise in temperature of between 4C and 6C by the end of the century,” said Corinne le Quere, a carbon specialist at the University of East Anglia, eastern England.

“The estimate is based on growth trends that seem likely to last,” she said in a phone interview, pointing to the mounting consumption of coal by emerging giants.

Other research has warned of potentially catastrophic impacts from a temperature rise of this kind.

Chronic droughts and floods would bite into farm yields, violent storms and sea-level rise would swamp coastal cities and deltas, and many species would be wiped out, unable to cope with habitat loss.

Developed countries have largely stabilised their emissions since 1990, the benchmark year used in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations, the study said.

But this achievement has been eclipsed by emissions by China, India, Brazil and Indonesia and other developing economies, which are turning to cheap, plentiful coal to power their rise out of poverty.

In 1990, developing countries accounted for 35 per cent of worldwide output of CO2, the principal “greenhouse” gas blamed for warming Earth’s surface and inflicting damaging changes to the climate system.

In 2011, this was 58 per cent.

The temperature projections by the Global Carbon Project are at the top end of forecasts published by scientists ahead of the UNFCCC talks taking place in Doha, Qatar.

From Crikey

•                The amount of man-made carbon dioxide released in 2010 reached a record 10 billion tonnes, nearly 6 per cent higher than in 2009.

•                Global CO2 emissions since 2000 are tracking the high end of the projections used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which far exceed 2º warming by 2100.

•                The past decade has seen an unprecedented increase in greenhouse gases released from fossil fuels, deforestation and the manufacture of cement, resulting in an average rise of 3.1 per cent per year. This compares with an annual increase of just 1 per cent per year during the 1990s.

•                The global emissions of carbon dioxide from man-made sources have increased by nearly 50 per cent over the past two decades, culminating in the release of a record 10 billion tons of carbon dioxide in 2010. The trend has continued on the same trajectory during 2011.

•                We are now tracking the high end of the worst case scenario of the IPCC. At the moment we are very far away from keeping within the target of a 2º increase in global temperatures by the end of the century. We are more on course for a 4º rise, and possibly as high as 6º if carbon feedbacks begin.

•                In the developed world, carbon dioxide emissions fell by 1.3 per cent in 2008 and fell again by 7.6 per cent in 2009, rising by 3.4 per cent in 2010.

•                In the developing world, dominated by China, emissions increased by 4.4 per cent in 2008, increased by 3.9 per cent in 2009 and 7.6 per cent in 2010.

The figure for 2010 cancels out a downturn in emissions the year before.

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From The Australian: Levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide are rising annually by around three per cent, placing Earth on track for warming that could breach 5C by 2100, a new study published says.

The figure – among the most alarming of the latest forecasts by climate scientists – is at least double the 2C target set by UN members struggling for a global deal on climate change.

In 2011, global carbon emissions were 54 per cent above 1990 levels, according to the research, published in the journal, Nature Climate Change, by the Global Carbon Project consortium.

“We are on track for the highest emissions projections, which point to a rise in temperature of between 4C and 6C by the end of the century,” said Corinne le Quere, a carbon specialist at the University of East Anglia, eastern England.

“The estimate is based on growth trends that seem likely to last,” she said in a phone interview, pointing to the mounting consumption of coal by emerging giants. Read more

Hope?

From The Australian HISTORY showed it was still possible to reduce carbon dioxide emissions sufficiently to meet a UN target of keeping a global temperature rise to below two degrees Celsius, a new report has said.

The increased use of natural gas to replace coal and oil had enabled the United States to cut its carbon emissions by 1.4 per cent a year since 2005.

This mirrored savings achieved in Europe and the UK in response to the oil shock of the 1970s.

Overall, the latest Global Carbon Project calculations, published in Nature Climate Change to coincide with the UN climate talks in Doha, present a grim picture.

Global cost emissions have increased by 58 per cent since 1990, rising three per cent in 201, and 2.6 per cent in 2012.

The most recent figure is estimated from a 3.3 per cent growth in gross domestic product and a 0.7 per cent improvement in the carbon intensity of the economy.

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